Bathing in warm geothermal waters is an essential part of the Icelandic lifestyle, and thereby it is also common work ground for the local designers.

Here are a few bathing-related design projects for you to enjoy, happy bathing and good weekend!

 

 

1. Blue Lagoon

The Blue Lagoon spa and Clinic (images from the lesser known clinic) are designed by Sigríður Sigþórsdóttir of the Basalt architects. Completed in 1998, the Blue Lagoon is the most popular travel destination in Iceland.

A 200-meter path cutting through lava takes the visitors to the lagoon. The milky light blue waters are connected to its surroundings with a lava wall that cuts through the entire facility.

I attempted to capture the mystery of the location with the ever changing play of light and shadow across the lava, the steam from the lagoon and the special light that characterizes the northern part of the world.

Pure Icelandic materials from moss and stones characterize the design. We wanted to emphasize the relationship between nature and the man-made.

 
 

2. Swim wear by Eyglo

We have the pools, and now, finally, something awesome to wear while soaking in them too. Thanks go to fashion designer Eyglo Margret Lárusdóttir, whose SS2012 collection features stunning swim wear. The costumes come in two patterns, one is a scan and print of designer’s own hair, the other is inspired by a book on dinosaurs that Lárusdóttir’s son brought home from the library one day.

If in Reykjavik, head over to Kiosk that stocks Eyglo and a handful of other up-and-coming labels by the local fashion designers.

 

 

 
 

3. Reykjavik Towel and soap

Winner of the Reykjavík Souvenir Design Competition in 2010, Reykjavik Towel and soap take their shape from the hot pools of the city.

 

We got the architectural drawings of the old hot tubs in Laugardalslaug in Reykjavik and made the shape [of the soap] based on those drawings

And where do the design duo behind the products, Fridgerdur Gudmundsdóttir and Kristin Birna Bjarnadottir soak themselves?

 

Our favorite places in Reykjavik for swimming are Vesturbæjarlaug and Laugardalslaug.

 

 

 
 

4. Vatnavinir

 

Vatnavinir, “Friends of Water” is a collective of architects and designers working on water and health related tourism in Iceland.

 

The abundance of water and geothermal energy is a unique resource.  The network of water arteries and veins offers an inspiration to join efforts in networks supporting interrelated initiatives for long term economic regeneration.

 

The collective’s main project is the vision for Wellness Country Iceland, with the case study on the West Fjords, for which they were awarded the

Global Award for Sustainable Architecture 2011.

 

Along with eyLAND-lab, Vatnavinir worked on a project Wellness City Reykjavik. These sketches are a suggestion for Reykjavik Harbor Baths, looks fantastic, doesn’t it? Let’s hope this will happen soon!

 
 

5. Float

The silvery, sparkling Float cap by Unnur Valdís Kristjánsdóttir brings a bit of disco to the pool. That is just on the outside, though, as for the user, it is less beats and more peace – the cap aids floating and cuts out sound so that the floater can relax deeper. Fancy a try? Sóley Natura Spa offers weekly floating meditations.

 

Images Courtesy of designers