Grýtan is a new studio and a creative collective of 20 artists, designers, musicians, photographers and other makers, who opened their studio doors for our wonderful intern Marta.

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Previously a run-down Laundromat, Ingó Egils, product designer and creator of Nogi, moved to the space a few years ago. Since expanding the space in January 2014, a steady stream of creatives have moved in.

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Ingó initially started redesigning the space with recycled materials mostly. Each artist has also designed their own work spaces themselves, creating a unique mix of interior aesthetics.

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The mural on the right is hand-drawn by the Swedish illustrator Julia Mai Linnéa Maria.

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The studio behind these walls belongs to fashion designer Magnea Einarsdóttir, founder of Magnea. Focusing on knitwear, Einarsdóttir combines contrasting fabrics such as wool and rubber into innovative new pieces.

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Mural painting by artist Jón Gunnarsson – “Sonic & Co.”

Grýtan brings together arts, creating a common platform for all creative genres to thrive and blossom with inspiration from each other. It provides endless opportunities for collaborations and unique artistic combinations.

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Fashion designer Hulda Dröfn Atladóttir in her vibrant studio, also known for her clothing store Leynibúðin owned with Linda Ósk Guðmundsdóttir. Their designs include colorful fashion accessories, mixed prints and soft fabrics.

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Furniture and product designer Inga Sól Ingibjartadóttir, known for her home decor brand IngaSol Design combines the old with the new to create both functional and beautiful designs.

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Sara María Júlíudóttir, screen printer and founder of clothing and textile lable FORYNJA is known for her hand printed textiles and loud prints.

The studio also includes other artists. Fashion designer Sif Baldursdóttir  founded Kyrja in 2012. Clean with edgy lines, comfortable yet crisp, the pieces mix silk, bamboo and mohair in trademark black. Keep an eye on this one!

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All the items shown in the kitchen have been rebuilt and designed by Ingó and the Grýtan collective.

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The future however of Grýtan is unclear, as The City of Reykjavik is currently looking for a buyer for the lot, possibly for developing an apartment complex or a hotel. The development may not come as a surprise to anyone who has witnessed a similar faith.

“I think we need more collectives like Grytan where designers and artists get to meet, mingle and hopefully collaborate. It is important to have more opportunities to sell directly to the people and get some feedback from the consumer” – Inga Sól

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Artwork by Kitty Von Sometime

“The number of torn down wasted spaces and empty repossessed buildings in Reykjavik is killing its heart. To keep its capital thriving there needs to be more than guest houses, tourist shops and corporate offices. Enabling creative blood flow through the city works..Iceland needs to support its artistic community and see the long term damage that’s coming if this continues” – Kitty Von Sometime

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“It is important to get more info on what funds exists, don’t tear down houses where creativity actually happens. As in any country being an artist should be considered work” – Julia Mai

Considering the fundamental importance this collective has had to the various artists, we sincerely hope that Grýtan will flourish as long as possible – and that the situation with working spaces for creatives in Reykjavik will develop to enhance and support the creative fields of the city.

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The studio is a vision and true catalyst to the talent that lies in these artists and we thank them for briefly letting us into their universe.

See the full list of Grýtan members here.

 

Images courtesy of Aníta Bjork